Give It a Try

If you fancy giving it a try you'll find our members to be a friendly bunch who are happy to pass on their skills and knowledge to newcomers. We have three full-size lawns and our season runs from April until October (if weather and the parks department permit).

 

Watch a Croquet Association video

 

Those who already play croquet will know what a delightful game it is and what a fine sport it can be for those with a more competitive nature. What you may not know is that Enfield is the only Croquet Club with their own lawns within a nine mile radius.

 

If you are interested

 

Try Croquet Free on our Introductory Course - advertised on the Home Page January - April

 

With no obligation and no financial outlay before deciding whether or not you might like to take up the sport.

 

You can lose nothing by giving it a go, so why not come along and give it a try? You may be as pleasantly surprised by the game as all of our current members were when they first picked up a croquet mallet.

 

Each April we run free courses for newcomers, details of which can be found on our Home and Calendar pages.

Despite the somewhat moderate weather our 2016 Training Course was a great success and has resulted in a number of new members joining the Club


Photos from the 2015 and 2016 Training Courses shown here

What skills are required in a game of croquet?

 

Well in essence just the ability to be able to stand still and to hit a ball with a mallet, ideally with a reasonable degree of accuracy. This is a relatively simple talent that most people can acquire with practice. At its very highest levels you might compare it to the accuracy required for snooker or the putting play in golf.

 

On the tactical side comparisons with the complexities of a cricket or a chess match wouldn't be unreasonable. Combine these with a game played on a reasonably flat grass surface and you have the basic concept.

 

Croquet is as competitive and/or social as you would wish it to be and our Club caters for both with some individuals who only play socially and others who partake in both internal and external competitions at the highest levels.

 

What you don't require is strength, stamina or the ability to run around. Nor do you require fast reflexes or the ability to hit a moving target as you do in so many other sports. You don't even need a competitive edge to play for fun, but it certainly helps if you want to win more often than you lose.

 

There are two principal variations of croquet currently played in the UK, differing in the scoring systems and order of shots. Both are played through obstacles called hoops and employ the same course layout. Croquet can be played in back gardens or any flat piece of ground and may be adapted to smaller than standard playing courts but it is so much better when played on a decent full sized surface. The good news then is that our club plays on three competition sized lawns of a decent quality and with all the necessary equipment provided for free.

Anyone who has never played before will no doubt be asking why croquet? And the answer is because it's good fun and a sociable ball game for people of all ages played in a friendly atmosphere. It is also one of the few sports where guys and girls, or ladies and gentlemen if you prefer, can and do compete on an equal basis thanks to the handicap system deployed in croquet.

 

Croquet seems to have acquired a certain image over the years and no doubt many people who've never played will have certain preconceptions.